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As the High Holiday sermons approach, congregations prepare for a large influx of attendants of all levels of observance. But sadly, not everyone is physically capable of attending those services. 

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The High Holidays are an especially busy time for a rabbi, and it makes the preparation a high-pressure endeavor. Some rabbis prepares for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur for several months, if not a year, in advance. But for the five new rabbis who made Phoenix their home this summer, there we…

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For Yael Michaely, her husband Boaz, and their three young children, feeling at home in their new country began in earnest one autumn evening in 2004. For these Israelis recently transplanted to Newton, Massachusetts, the neighborhood sukkah hop transformed anonymous streets into a community…

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With the holiday of Sukkot beginning at sundown on Sunday, many families and congregations are busy erecting the holiday’s namesake hut — the sukkah. While its form is familiar, what is the deeper meaning of the fragile, temporary structure, and what does it represent? Why is this building d…

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So, everyone who’s ever purchased a bundle or three of parsley for Pesach and then still seemed to have a bundle or three of parsley left when the Seders were over, please raise your hand.

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While I love Passover, I find breakfast the most challenging meal during the holiday of unleavened bread. Removing foods made with flour and grains from breakfast menus means digging deep into the creative side of my brain.

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Even though “stylish” and “traditional” may seem like opposites and mean something different to each of us, the two qualities can actually be combined beautifully and comfortably, especially at Passover.

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For a millennia-old religious celebration that has little to do with physical well-being, the Passover holiday offers unexpected health-related opportunities.

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In keeping with the spirit of Purim, perhaps the most irreverent of Jewish holidays, the Chabad of the East Valley’s CTeen program is going to bake what it is dubbing “America’s Largest Hamantash” on Feb. 27. Though Jewish News was unable to confirm if the hamantashen will be the largest in …

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Whether it is bearing fruit, cleaning the air or protecting us from an oppressive sun, the value of trees — and nature itself — has long been recognized by the Jewish people.

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This propane-fueled menorah was built by Meir Schwabinger.

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Chabad of the East Valley has announced plans for its Sukkah Hopping Tour, which invites children and parents to visit four sukkahs throughout the East Valley in order to view and celebrate the different customs and traditions around the holiday and its iconic structure.

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The general rule of a break-the-fast meal seems to be simple, relatively light and requiring minimal day-of preparation.

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For the first time in nearly a decade, Gesher Disability Resources (formerly the Council For Jews With Special Needs) will be providing sign language interpretation for High Holiday services. Gesher is partnering with Temple Emanuel of Tempe to provide the services.

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Coming from a non-observant family of Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union to Israel, a country where many people tend to lead secular lifestyles to begin with, I wasn’t raised in a particularly religious environment. In fact, I can count on fewer than five fingers the times that I…

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Between blasting shofars, snacking on sweet treats, family and community gatherings and a break from the usual routine of the school day, the High Holidays are a special time for children.

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Despite relative isolation from their Jewish brethren around the world for millennia, Ethiopian Jews have coveted the same dream of celebrating Rosh Hashanah “next year in Jerusalem.”

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There are an estimated 3,500 Jewish students at Arizona State University’s four campuses. Of those, many come from out of state — but they don’t have to observe the High Holidays alone. Chabad at ASU, ASU Hillel and Jewish Arizonans on Campus offer a host of services and meals to make them f…

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There’s an old joke about a boy who shows up at a synagogue on Yom Kippur. The usher tells him he can’t come in without a ticket. “But I’m not staying. I just need to talk to my mother,” the boy pleads. “Well, all right,” the usher says. “But if I catch you praying, I’m kicking you out!”

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For rabbis, it’s their annual golden opportunity to reach a much larger audience than usual. For members of a congregation, they can be either enlightening or entertaining highlights of the services, or dreary and sometimes infuriating sessions. In any scenario, there’s no better barometer o…

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With the High Holidays just around the corner, now is a natural time for reflecting on the mitzvot performed throughout the year and to pause and consider what more can be done in the coming year.

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Jewish families around the world begin Rosh Hashanah meals by dipping apples in honey, symbolizing their hope for a sweet New Year. They also drizzle honey into holiday cuisine.

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An estimated 1,500 or more people gathered at Castles & Coasters in Phoenix on May 14 for Chabad of Arizona’s community Lag B’Omer celebration.

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Lag B’Omer isn’t one of the best-known Jewish holidays — though some may notice that the men whose faces have grown fairly fuzzy following Passover are suddenly clean-shaven again.

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What holiday is not mentioned in the Torah or anywhere until the 13th century and has no particular foods associated with it? The answer is Lag b’Omer. The Torah commands us to begin on the second night of Passover and count the omer. Omer, which means sheaf, was a measure of grain from the …

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Nurit Avigdor of Scottsdale leads a pet seder at Choice Pet Market in Scottsdale on April 2. The seder, which included Passover songs, dog yarmulkes and kosher pet food giveways, was sponsored by Evanger’s Dog and Cat Food Company, who manufactures kosher dog and cat food for Passover. Guest…

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At Passover, Jews around the world gather around their dining-room tables to remember their past plight as slaves in Egypt. But the seder can also be a time to learn about the hardships facing others today.

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When Rabbi Robert Kravitz pulled off his tie at the Latino-Jewish Seder on March 21, he said it was symbolic of seeking freedom. Wearing a tie, he said, is a custom that feels confining and men do it to themselves out of social convention. So he liberated himself of the tie and continued lea…

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Even the most finicky wine snob won’t be able to “pass over” the new generation of kosher wines. Increasingly, the mindset is that since Jews are commanded to drink four cups of wine at the Passover seder, they might as well drink high-quality wine.

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