Caring for captured and wounded enemy soldiers a fundamental IDF value - www.jewishaz.com: Commentary

Caring for captured and wounded enemy soldiers a fundamental IDF value

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Posted: Wednesday, July 5, 2017 7:33 am

One of the greatest challenges of a medical corps team member is to care for captured and wounded enemy soldiers. I served as an army medic during the 1967 Six-Day War in the battle over Jerusalem and as a battalion physician in the 1973 Yom Kippur War in the Sinai Desert. In both wars, I cared for many captured and wounded enemy prisoners.

The Six-Day War broke out two weeks before the end of my last year at Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem. I had worked as a nurse in the emergency room of the Hadassah University hospital for the prior two years and was stationed at that hospital when the war started. I also went out with the ambulances to evacuate the wounded back to the hospital and cared for them during the ride.

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